PTSD, VA & SSA Don’t Play Well with 2A

(from leviathyn.com)
“No Breather from Work. No Relief from Combat. No Request for Respite. No Slack.” —motto of the No Slack Battalion of the 101st Airborne Infantry When I joined the army in 2005 as an 18 year old , I had no idea what lay in my future. I had written my high school thesis on the Army’s new implementation of helicopters delivering troops to the battlefield in the Ia Drang Valley during the Vietnam War. In Mel Gibson’s film, We Were Soldiers, and through the research I conducted, I learned of the...
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Medicine’s Shameful Silence on Silencers

{AP Photo/Lisa Marie Pane)
[Ed: DRGO is reprinting Dr. Wheeler's Washington Examiner article published there yesterday.] What if a cheap, simple, and safe method existed for preventing permanent hearing loss in tens of millions of Americans? America's doctors should be singing its praises and recommending it to their patients. American doctor organizations should be doing the same, as well as vigorously supporting the Hearing Protection Act (H.R. 367 and its companion bill S. 59) or the newly introduced Silence...
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Claremont Institute’s Publius Fellows Practice the Second Amendment

Publius Fellows 2017
DRGO was originally a project of the Claremont Institute, now located in Upland, California.  We were a good fit because the Claremont Institute, a leading curator and school of America’s founding ideas, naturally supports the Second Amendment.  Even though DRGO has since become a project of the Second Amendment Foundation, we still collaborate with Claremont on important gun rights projects. The Publius Fellowship is one of four annual courses in the principles of American government tau...
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Public health, social science, and the scientific method. Part II

[Ed: After testifying to the House Appropriations Committee in 1996, Dr. Faria was tapped to serve at the CDC on the NCIPC's grant review committee during the George W. Bush administration. This two-part series (Part I here), republished with permission, describes his tenure there. Originally published by World of Neurosurgery in March, 2007] In Part I, we discussed in general terms some of the shortcomings I encountered in many of the grant proposals submitted during my stint as a gran...
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The Illusion of Safety

(from hCentive.com)
“Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem” Thomas Jefferson, from a letter to James Madison Jefferson’s Latin is probably most often translated as “I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery”, though, in the context of the letter, it might be more accurately “I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude”. But in truth we rarely face a choice between dangerous freedom and peaceful slavery.  It’s usually a question of sacrificing—or being forced to sacrifice—in...
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GUNS REDUCE SUFFERING

(from: crosswalk.com)
One aim of medicine – and ostensibly of public health – is to reduce suffering. It is one of the most noble things to which a person can be called. It is under the standard of this lofty goal that today’s public health hoplophobes put forth their advocacy research and agitate for decent people being stripped of their fundamental rights. They couch their position in the context of health care. But their field is public policy and law, not medicine. They want the public and policy makers...
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For the Children

(from: digest.bps.org.uk)
There have been many breathless headlines lately about "Child" deaths by firearms, precipitated by the recent publication of a study in the journal Pediatrics, “Childhood Firearm Injuries in the United States”. Once again, Organized Medicine is trotting out the dog and pony show about "gun violence" being a "public health problem", and the media is getting the vapors over "child" statistics. The problem —as is nearly always the case—is that they present an incomplete and slanted picture. ...
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Public health, social science, and the scientific method. Part I

[Ed: After testifying to the House Appropriations Committee in 1996, Dr. Faria was tapped to serve at the CDC on the NCIPC's grant review committee during the George W. Bush administration. This two-part series (Part II here), republished with permission, describes his tenure there. Originally published by World of Neurosurgery in February, 2007] INTRODUCTION During the years 2002 to 2004, I served in the Injury Research Grant Review Committee (more recently the “Initial Review Group”)...
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