Public health, social science, and the scientific method. Part II

[Ed: After testifying to the House Appropriations Committee in 1996, Dr. Faria was tapped to serve at the CDC on the NCIPC's grant review committee during the George W. Bush administration. This two-part series (Part I here), republished with permission, describes his tenure there. Originally published by World of Neurosurgery in March, 2007] In Part I, we discussed in general terms some of the shortcomings I encountered in many of the grant proposals submitted during my stint as a gran...
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GUNS REDUCE SUFFERING

(from: crosswalk.com)
One aim of medicine – and ostensibly of public health – is to reduce suffering. It is one of the most noble things to which a person can be called. It is under the standard of this lofty goal that today’s public health hoplophobes put forth their advocacy research and agitate for decent people being stripped of their fundamental rights. They couch their position in the context of health care. But their field is public policy and law, not medicine. They want the public and policy makers...
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For the Children

(from: digest.bps.org.uk)
There have been many breathless headlines lately about "Child" deaths by firearms, precipitated by the recent publication of a study in the journal Pediatrics, “Childhood Firearm Injuries in the United States”. Once again, Organized Medicine is trotting out the dog and pony show about "gun violence" being a "public health problem", and the media is getting the vapors over "child" statistics. The problem —as is nearly always the case—is that they present an incomplete and slanted picture. ...
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Public health, social science, and the scientific method. Part I

[Ed: After testifying to the House Appropriations Committee in 1996, Dr. Faria was tapped to serve at the CDC on the NCIPC's grant review committee during the George W. Bush administration. This two-part series (Part II here), republished with permission, describes his tenure there. Originally published by World of Neurosurgery in February, 2007] INTRODUCTION During the years 2002 to 2004, I served in the Injury Research Grant Review Committee (more recently the “Initial Review Group”)...
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The Gun As Talisman

A common adage in the gun owners' sphere is that a gun is not a talisman. This pithy phrase is used to emphasize the fact that possession does not equal competence. Picking up a firearm does not instantly turn a novice into John Wick. One must be practiced and proficient both in marksmanship and administrative handling to be safe and effective with a firearm. This basic concept seems lost on public health anti-gun crusader Garen Wintemute (himself a self-professed gun owner). (more&hel...
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Public Health is Not Medicine

One fundamental is crucial to understanding why doctors and organized medicine are involved in gun policy: Public health is not medicine. It is the primary tool and avenue through which hoplophobic medics seek to infringe on peoples’ right to keep and bear arms. But it is not the practice of medicine. Public health relies on medical data and facts gathered through epidemiological methods. But public health is not a clinical discipline. It is a legal one. In short, public health is t...
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Garen Wintemute, MD Creates Victims.

Nothing says “It’s summer in California!” these days like dumping five million dollars from already strained coffers into the piggy bank of a notorious anti-rights propagandist. And nothing celebrates that occasion better than a hagiographic fluff piece about the man for whose pet project that money has been ripped from the pockets of California gun-owning tax payers. No such screed would, of course, be complete without propagating the lie that the Centers for Disease Control has been ban...
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A Lesson from the Bronx Zoo

(from: jukani.co.za)
Many years ago, as a starving graduate student in New York City, I would regularly visit the Bronx Zoo. The zoo held many attractions for me. The biggest one was that admission was free. Yes, as fanciful as it sounds, in the distant past, there really were places in the Big Apple that charged nothing to get in. For this reason, on almost every Saturday, I took my young family out to see the animals. We bought a bag of peanuts for ten cents and split the contents with our primate cousins as ...
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